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ECE Ph.D. student Min Ye is one of six graduate student finalists in the Shannon Centennial Student Competition organized by Bell Labs, Nokia. The competition is a part of the First Shannon Conference on the Future of Information Age convened to celebrate the 100th birthday of Claude Shannon who proposed the central ideas of information theory while working for Bell Labs in the late 1940s.

The finalists in the competition will present their work on April 28 before industry experts and information theorists attending the Shannon Conference at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, N.J. Min Ye’s presentation will be on his work on coding solutions for distributed storage applications. Ye is a student of Professor Alexander Barg (ECE/ISR).



Related Articles:
Ephremides leads new NSF Age of Information project
Alumnus Raef Bassily joins Ohio State as tenure-track faculty
Ph.D. student Usman Fiaz competes in Unix 50 challenge at Nokia Bell Labs
New research on multi-information sources of multiphysics systems
Narayan is PI for NSF information-theoretic signal processing sampling research grant
Alum Ahmed Arafa to join UNC Charlotte faculty this fall
Sennur Ulukus is plenary speaker at Canadian Workshop on Information Theory
Ye, Barg win IEEE Data Storage Best Paper Award
Narayan and students publish three articles in IEEE Transactions on Information Theory
Ulukus is PI for new NSF information-theoretic physical layer security grant

April 5, 2016


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