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A prototype robotic 'fish' being tested in Paley's Collective Dynamics and Control Lab.

A prototype robotic 'fish' being tested in Paley's Collective Dynamics and Control Lab.

 

Professor Derek Paley (AE/ISR) was a guest on the public radio show On the Record on March 5. The program is produced by WYPR, 88.1 FM in Baltimore. Host Sheilah Kast spoke with Paley in a show titled “Technology Inspired by Nature,” which explored how researchers are incorporating the abilities of insects, birds, fish and animals to improve robots.

In his segment, Paley talks about his own research to explain how understanding the fluid movements of fish can help improve underwater vehicle function. He also explains why scientists look to nature for answers.

| Listen to the interview at NPR One (Dr. Paley’s segment begins at 11:30 of the podcast) |



Related Articles:
New ONR grant for bio-inspired underwater sensing and control
Paley is Principal Investigator for $2M 'SEA-STAR' grant
Alumnus Xiaobo Tan elevated to IEEE Fellow
Derek Paley is AIAA National Capital Section's Engineer of the Year
Robotic fish research profiled in Baltimore Sun
Derek Paley wins PECASE Award
UAE students, Northrop Grumman engineers tour robotics laboratories
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Maryland Robotics Center featured on live TV broadcast

March 6, 2018


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