search

UMD     This Site





In a July 3 Washington Post story, Professor Tony Ephremides (ECE/ISR) provides technical expertise about the feasibility of jamming cell phone signals at prisons.

Because prisoners can easily gain access to cell phones, they can run their operations from the inside, including drug dealing, ordering hits on witnesses and more. Officials are looking into the possibility of jamming cell phone signals around prisons, but industry spokespeople warn that the general public also might have its cell signals blocked in areas close to the prisons.

Ephremides is the Cynthia Kim Eminent Professor of Information Technology in the A. James Clark School of Engineering.

Read the story at the Washington Post website.

July 6, 2009


«Previous Story  

 

 

Current Headlines

Nima Ghalichechian begins Ohio State tenure-track position 

UMD Takes Second Place in NASA RASC-AL Competition

Coelho, Austin and Blackburn win best paper award at ICONS 2017

Ryzhov promoted, granted ISR/Smith School joint appointment

Miao Yu named Maryland Robotics Center director

Decade of TMV research leads to never-before-seen microsystems for energy storage, biosensors and self-sustaining systems

Former ISR postdoc Matthew McCarthy earns tenure at Drexel University

New TMV supercapacitor work featured in Nanotechweb article

Jonathan Fritz promoted to Research Scientist

ISR postdoc helps develop 'nanosponge' that erases and repairs incredibly small errors

 
 
Back to top  
Home Clark School Home UMD Home